Racial States, Racialised Religion and the Question of Liberal Justice

KL16 - The University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre, Kuala Lumpur, WP Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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Racial States, Racialised Religion and the Question of Liberal Justice will be organized at KL16, The University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre, Level 2 Chulan Tower, No. 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur on 28th July 2016 (Thursday).

* For more information, please visit this website https://www.eventbrite.com/e/racial-states-racialised-religion-and-the-question-of-liberal-justice-tickets-26654051987?aff=es2

The Institute of Asia Pacific Studies, Malaysia is pleased to invite you to a seminar titled, 'Racial States, Racialised Religion and the Question of Liberal Justice'. 


Abstract
Are modern nation-states capable of overcoming the issues of race and religion? The framework of political liberalism, that is the rule of law based on the equality of citizenship without reference to race or religion, is often posited as the ideal nation-state formation. Certainly, this is often expressed as a desired alternative future for Malaysia. And yet, the problems of ethnoracial supremacy, terrorism, and state violence against minorities suggest that the ideal is rare in practice, either in the East or the West. This talk explores the question of liberal justice as the solution to the issues of race and religion in the contemporary world.


About the speaker
Dr
 Mohan Ambikaipaker is a social anthropologist and cultural studies scholar who studies the dynamics of multiracial societies. He is the co-author (with Robert Berkeley and Omar Khan) ofWhat’s New about New Immigrants in 21st Century Britain? (Joseph Rowntree, 2006). His research trajectory is comprised of three strands (U.K., Malaysia and the U.S.) and aims to examine the shifting configurations of racism and racial structures that go beyond bipolar frameworks of analysis (for example, Black-White or Asian-White dynamics). He has constructed a long-term comparative research agenda that builds cross-national perspectives in theorising connections between critical cultural communication, intersectional racial identities, and globalised nation-states. 

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